Mission Work


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 Mission Work

​​The Pontifical Mission Societies of the Diocese of Greensburg, responding to the church document "Mission Ad Gentes," continues to vigorously pursue its role in the evangelization of peoples. This is accomplished through educational programs, appeals from workers in the mission fields, and the charism of prayer. Together we bring forth the kingdom of God.
_MotherTeresa.gifMother Teresa
More than a decade after her death, Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta, known as the “Saint of the Gutters” for her work with the poor, still inspires the faithful to dedicate their lives to serving others. "In her, we perceive the urgency to put oneself in a state of service, especially for the poorest and most forgotten, the last of the last," said then Pope Joh​n Paul​ II, Oct. 19, 2003, during the beatification of the beloved Nobel Prize-win​ning nun, who died in 1997 at the age of 87.

 

Today, the sisters and brothers of Mother Teresa’s order, the Missionaries of Charity, founded in 1950, continue her work in the slums of Calcutta, India, and around the world.


_FultonSheen.gifArchbishop
Fulton 
J. Sheen

Evangelization was a gift for Archbishop
Fu​lton J. Shee​n​
, one of the best “spokesmen” the Catholic Church has ever had. He spread the word to the masses via a national radio broadcast beginning in 1930, and, later, a weekly prime-time television program that reached millions. Archbishop Sheen 
was director of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith from 1950 to 1966, when he was named bishop of Rochester, N.Y. 

 

"Everything that you have so tirelessly accomplished in the past, by deed and by the spoken word, to feed Christ's flock has won for you universal acclaim. We now nourish the fond hope that in the future you will vigorously undertake even greater things,” said then Pope Paul VI, in a 1966 letter appointing him to the post.

 How To Help

The Mission Office encourages individuals of all ages to dedicate time, talent and treasure to the local and world missions. 
 
_april_smith.jpgEach month, the Mission Office receives more than 100 requests from missionaries, schools and religious communities locally and from around the world. The office reviews each request and, if able, extends assistance. Funds come from the people of the diocese, the Mission Cooperative Program and collections held throughout the year.
 
Local Missions
The Ligonier-based Rich in Mercy Mis​sion Institute works to meet the material and spiritual needs of the poor in Haiti. The Institute sponsors “reverse mission” pilgrimages and support in the form of medicine, medical and school supplies, and other goods to clinics, schools and orphanages, as well as grants for educational scholarships and sustainable development projects.

Rendu Servi​ces, based in Dunbar, provides services to needy people in Fayette County, including a mobile health van, parish nursing and a monthly food bank. Rendu Services also partners with the Fayette County Housing Authority to provide an after-school program and educational and recreational activities for children, educational and recreational programs for adults, and health and recreational programs for families.
 
​The Mission Office also assists seminarians from mission-funded dioceses attending Saint V​incent Seminary in Latrobe. The seminary is the fourth oldest Catholic seminary in the United States, shaped by the Benedictine heritage of liturgical prayer, study, hospitality and community. 

 Worldwide Missions
​​Catholic Volunteer Network, established in 1963, is a non-profit membership organization of 215 domestic and international volunteer and lay mission programs. They foster and promote full-time domestic and international faith-based volunteer service opportunities for people of all ages, backgrounds, and skills. As the leading membership organization of Christian volunteer and mission programs, we support and enhance the work of our members through volunteer recruitment, training and resources, networking opportunities, and advocacy.
 

Partners in Progress​ (PIP) is a national, Pennsylvania-based, non-profit corporation founded in 1999 by members of the Pittsburgh Regional Haiti Solidarity Committee. Their mission is to partner with rural-based organizations in Haiti to strengthen and build cultural, economic, natural resource and social assets for sustainable community development.

 Get Involved in Mission Work Resources

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Notes
  
expand Resource : A Simple House ‎(1)
expand Resource : Catholic Relief Services (CRS) ‎(1)
expand Resource : Holy Childhood Association (HCA) ‎(1)
expand Resource : Lay Mission Helpers ‎(1)
expand Resource : Mission Santa Maria ‎(1)
expand Resource : Prosan Catholic Radio Program  ‎(1)
expand Resource : The Society for the Propagation of the Faith (SPOF)  ‎(1)
expand Resource : United States Catholic Mission Association (USCMA) ‎(1)

 Mission Cooperation Plan

The Mission Cooperation Plan directs missionaries into parishes across our diocese once a year to describe the conditions of their country and solicit ​funds for particular needs. Through this plan, 27-30 missionary groups visit our parish communities. Those who visit the parishes are selected by the diocesan director of the Mission Office from a pool of hundreds of request​s. The money collected is then forwarded to the specific group through the Mission Office. 

 Our Response to Mission Work Questions

​​Many individuals have questions surrounding missionary work, the Pontifical Mission Societies, or where their money actually goes once they decide to make a contribution to a cause or appeal. Some of our responses to the top questions we receive are listed below. If you have an additional question that we might be able to assist you wit​h, please don't hesitate​ to contact our diocesan Mission Office​ directly at 724-837-0901. 
Response
collapse Question : A priest from India just visited my parish during his homily, he asked for help for his diocese. Does the money I offer during this special collection get sent to the Pontifical Mission Societies? ‎(1)
Very often, priests and religious visit the United States to seek prayer and financial support for the work of their dioceses or religious communities in the missions. These parish appeals are coordinated in dioceses by the Pontifical Mission Societies director as part of the Missionary Cooperation Plan. The money collected in parishes in response to such visits is given directly to the missionaries for use in their dioceses or by their congregations.
collapse Question : How are my donations distributed to the missions? ‎(1)
Offerings from Catholics in the United States are combined with offerings to the Propagation of the Faith from Catholics worldwide. Mission dioceses receive regular annual assistance from the funds collected. These grants are provided according to a diocese's size.

In addition, mission dioceses submit requests to the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples for assistance for, among other needs, catechetical programs, seminaries, the work of religious communities, communication and transportation needs, and the building of chapels and churches.

These needs are then matched with the funds gathered each year. The world's national directors of the Pontifical Mission Societies vote on these requests, matching the funds available with the greatest of needs for help. Funds are then distributed to mission dioceses throughout the world, directly from the country in which that help was raised. 
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